Tambour embroidery: where was it used and how was it done?

Tambour embroidery: where was it used and how was it done?

21 June 2022, 20:00
A source: © violity.com
496
Tambour embroidery is one of the oldest. Easy to learn, practical and very solemn. Chain stitches were often used to decorate towels because of the possibility of creating various patterns along a free contour. Such embroidery was often used by craftswomen from Kharkiv, Poltava, Chernihiv, and Sumy regions. Let's take a look at what makes her so special.

It is believed that the chain stitch was first used in the countries of the Middle East, Ancient Greece and Rome. Some of the first specimens were discovered two thousand years ago. But over time, this type of hand seam began to spread throughout the world.

The tambour stitch got its name from the name of a round hoop that resembled a big drum or tambourine. As a rule, in the past, carpets were decorated with tambour embroidery. Later, this type of seam began to change, and the traditional technology of applying threads to the fabric received its variations in the form of chains, loops, herringbones and other things.

Usually, the embroidery needle was replaced by a small hook with a pointed tip for better piercing of the fabric. Such a “tool” allowed embroiderers to pull the working thread through the fabric and create chain stitches.

Chain stitch was used for various items. But most of all, such embroidery was suitable for creating wedding and wedding towels. Variants of patterns on them depended on the imagination of the craftswoman. But certain rules were still followed. All wedding towels were conditionally divided into two parts - male and female. Images and patterns were paired - trees, doves, swallows and other birds.

Tambour embroidery also made it possible to make full use of floral ornaments - viburnum, poppy, grapes, oak, and so on. An example of such a product is crocheted towel, displayed on the Violity website in the subsection "Towels".

Photo © violity.com

Photo © violity.com

Photo © violity.com

Photo © violity.com

Photo © violity.com

Photo © violity.com

Photo © violity.com

Photo © violity.com

Photo © violity.com

Photo © violity.com

Photo © violity.com
Search for lots
* Select a section
Search section
Search:
Search results in:
Sections
Lot
Buy
Sell