nat4b
nat4b
15 September 2022, 11:22

The Creator and the Atom: "Nuclear Mysticism" by Salvador Dali

The Creator and the Atom: "Nuclear Mysticism" by Salvador Dali
The events associated with the use of nuclear weapons in 1945 are reflected in the work of Salvador Dali. It was a kind of starting point for a new period. The atom began to occupy almost a central place in the works of the Catalan.
 
The new period was called "nuclear mysticism", which lasted from 1949 to 1966.
The first sign in this direction was the work on the splitting of the atom. This was the first touch that allowed the world to take a fresh look at Dali's work. Frightening surrealism "missed" forward classical motifs, read in symmetry, the arrangement of objects in spite of the forces of gravity. The division into parts has become the unspoken personification of a nuclear reaction.
 
"Nuclear mysticism" is also manifested in the film "Atomic Leda". There he is presented in synthesis with ancient mythology.
 
At that time, the artist was very interested in the latest theories in the field of physics. In particular, he was attracted by quantum physics. It was rumored that Dali even decided to give up alcohol to keep his brain in good shape. So he allegedly prepared to gain new knowledge.
 
It was logical to reflect a new worldview in the artist's work – "Disintegration of the Persistence of Memory", "Ultramarine-corpuscular Ascension", "Atomic Cross" and other paintings.
 
Madonnas, objects divided into parts and hovering in the air. Some of them are elements of already recognizable images, as in the painting Madonna in Particles.
In this work, Dali feels the anxiety that manifests itself in the gloomy clouds around the Virgin. The absence of a face, fragmentation, as if unshakable foundations are being undermined. Ideas that have evolved over the centuries.
 
Of course, this could be a coincidence. But it is precisely this atmosphere that appears in Dali's paintings in the aforementioned period. It was his artistic manifesto.

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