Daria_Kuldushova
Daria_Kuldushova
8 September 2023, 18:34

The treasure of the century was discovered in Norway.

The treasure of the century was discovered in Norway.
51-year-old Norwegian Erlend Bore recently bought a metal detector as a hobby to walk and move more. So at the end of the summer, he was walking with a metal detector in the mountainous terrain of the island of Rennesoy when he discovered something incomprehensible. At first, the man thought that these could be buried chocolate coins, but when he looked around, he was amazed, because the find was incredible. He said that as a child he dreamed of being an archaeologist, so we can say that his dream came true.
Erlend Bore poses with a gold treasure he discovered with a metal detector. Anniken Celine Berger/ Archaeological Museum, UiS via NTV via AR
Erlend Bore poses with a gold treasure he discovered with a metal detector. Anniken Celine Berger/ Archaeological Museum, UiS via NTV via AR
The man found 3 rings, 9 pendants and 10 gold pearls. Jewelry weighing more than 100 grams. Excavations were carried out by archaeologists, and the treasure was handed over to the state in accordance with the laws of Norway.

"This is the golden find of the century in Norway! To find so much gold at once is an extremely rare chance," said Ole Madsen, director of the Archaeological Museum at the University of Stavanger

Associate professor of the museum Håkon Reyersen also shares his impressions of the find: "There has not been a similar discovery in Norway since the 19th century, and it is also a very unusual discovery in Scandinavian context".
Restorer Hege Hollund from The archaeological museum of the University of Stavanger examines the gold found. Anniken Celine Berger/Archaeological Museum, UiЅ via NTB via AR
Restorer Hege Hollund from The archaeological museum of the University of Stavanger examines the gold found. Anniken Celine Berger/Archaeological Museum, UiЅ via NTB via AR
Bracteates are thin one-sided gold coin pendants. Apparently, they were elements of a very beautiful necklace that could only belong to a person with a high status. After all, such jewelry is expensive, and only real masters of the jewelry craft could make such jewelry. The artifacts are tentatively dated to 500 AD. This period is called the time of resettlement in Norway and migrations in Europe.
Anniken Celine Berger/Archaeological Museum, UiS via NTB via AR
Anniken Celine Berger/Archaeological Museum, UiS via NTB via AR
"About 1,000 gold bracteates have been found so far in Norway, Sweden and Denmark," said Sigmund Erl, an expert in the study of such pendants at the museum.
Professor Sigmund Erl from the Archaeological Museum of the University of Stavanger studies the find. Anniken Celine Berger/ Archaeological Museum, UiS via NTV via AR
Professor Sigmund Erl from the Archaeological Museum of the University of Stavanger studies the find. Anniken Celine Berger/ Archaeological Museum, UiS via NTV via AR
The expert also talked about the symbols on the pendants. Most pendants depict the Scandinavian god Odin. One heals his son's horse. But the horse pendants found show that the horse is wounded. This is indicated by the posture, crooked legs, and the horse's tongue hanging on gold pendants. "The symbol of the horse symbolized illness and suffering, but at the same time the hope of healing and new life.".

"Given where it was found and what we know about other similar finds, it's probably either a hidden treasure or an offering to the gods during hard times",-says Professor Reiersen
Reconstruction of the necklace found by Bore with the image of a horse from Scandinavian mythology. Theo Ely GILL BELL
Reconstruction of the necklace found by Bore with the image of a horse from Scandinavian mythology. Theo Ely GILL BELL
The lucky Erlend Bore and the landowner on whose territory the jewels were found will receive a reward from the state. 

And in the Archaeological Museum of the city of Stavanger they plan to display the treasure for inspection.

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