Verdex
Verdex
27 October 2023, 00:18

Photographs of Parisian streets and visual experiments by Brassaï

Photographs of Parisian streets and visual experiments by Brassaï
Hungarian photographer Brassai (real name Gyula Halas) lived most of his life in France and was closely associated with Salvador Dali, Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, Jean Genet, Henri Michaud and other famous artists and writers who greatly influenced his work. In 1924, Brassaï moved to Paris and quickly fell in love with the city. He walked for a long time along the evening streets, photographing the darkest corners of Paris. At the same time, his acquaintance with the creative elite allowed him to capture fragments from the life of high society. Brassaï collaborated with the American magazine Harper's Bazaar, took commercial photographs to earn money and at the same time experimented with images, being influenced by the avant-garde artists.
Brassaï learned about the possibility of filming at night from his friend, Andre Kertesz. In the 1930s, he began photographing Parisian buildings, nooks, and paving stones at night. Thus was born the Paris at Night series, published in 1933. The lens repeatedly captured prostitutes, whom Brassaï called “Venus of the crossroads.” Another time, he photographed wet paving stones with only artificial street lighting at his disposal.
After World War II, Brassaï continued to experiment with images, infusing his works with the spirit of pre-war Dadaism and surrealism. Thus, in 1967, the Transmutations series was born. Using the collage technique, the photographer combined fragments of photographs with graphics, combined figures, often using images of a naked female body.
Brassai's works brought him worldwide fame. In 1948, a major solo exhibition took place at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. In subsequent years, the artist repeatedly exhibited his works here. In 2000, the Pompidou Center in Paris presented 450 works by Brassai to the public; many photographs are now kept in the Victoria and Albert Museum, Tate Gallery, Art Museum in Amsterdam, etc.
Source: artic.edu

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