nat4b
nat4b
29 November 2023, 09:57

Ancient Egyptian figurines have been found in Scotland for years. Scientists understood how they got there

Ancient Egyptian figurines have been found in Scotland for years. Scientists understood how they got there
The first references to these artifacts date back to 1952, when a small statuette was found on the grounds of the Scottish boarding school Melville House. Later, these finds were repeated, and only after numerous statements did archaeologists take up the matter.

After analyzing the artifacts found on the grounds of the Melville House boarding school, the researchers concluded that the found figurines date back to 1069 to 30 BC. According to Margaret Maitland, chief curator of the Ancient Mediterranean at the National Museum of Scotland, the objects are likely to be part of a mysterious collection. But the most surprising fact is that they were buried in Scotland.
Photo source: National Museum of Scotland
Photo source: National Museum of Scotland
According to researchers, one of the previous owners of these lands, Lord Balgoni, who visited Egypt in 1856 with his family, could have purchased these items at one time. After his death, family members probably hid everything. By the way, this magnificent building in the county of Fife housed soldiers during the Second World War, and only later opened a boarding school.

After the first artifact was found on the grounds of the boarding school in 1952, several other ancient objects were later unearthed. This continued until 1984 - teachers and students brought each new find to museum curators and experts, who identified the statuettes as ancient Egyptian. But no one could find out how they ended up there.
Photo source: National Museum of Scotland
Photo source: National Museum of Scotland
Currently, this ancient collection includes a nearly 4,000-year-old statue head carved from red sandstone, several bronze and ceramic figurines dating from 1069 B.C. BC to 30 BC

Experts continue to analyze these artifacts in order to establish their exact origin and age. This discovery could prove key to understanding the contacts and interaction of the ancient Egyptian civilization with other cultures, or perhaps to the identification of an unknown period in the history of Scotland itself.
Photo source: National Museum of Scotland. Volunteers worked on the school grounds to try to unearth more artifacts, 1984.
Photo source: National Museum of Scotland. Volunteers worked on the school grounds to try to unearth more artifacts, 1984.
The director of the boarding school expressed admiration for these archaeological discoveries and emphasized the importance of preserving history and cultural heritage. Pupils, in turn, got a unique opportunity to observe the work of archaeologists and even participate in the excavation process, which can contribute to the development of their interest in history and science in general.

Source: bbc.co.uk

0
83

Comments

0
To participate in the discussion, please log in.
SearchClose