vassrotte
vassrotte
4 December 2023, 18:38

A rare Munich Calendar from 1887 was sold at Violity for 5600 UAH

A rare Munich Calendar from 1887 was sold at Violity for 5600 UAH
Last week, a 135-year-old copy of the famous Münchner Kalender almanac with illustrations by Otto Hupp became the star of the Periodicals category. 
The Munich calendar for 1887
The Munich calendar for 1887
Bidding for the lot started on November 21 and ended on December 3. During this time, many people gathered to replenish the collection with a bibliographic rarity: users made 227 bids. The winning bid was 5600 UAH.
According to the seller's description, the size of the old yearbook is 32×17 cm. Despite its age, the calendar is well preserved: all 34 pages are in place, with, among other things, calendars of church holidays and hunting, the genealogy of the royal house of Bavaria, a table of units of measurement, exchange rates, and much more.
Issues of the Munich Calendar can be seen in the collections of the world's leading archives and libraries and often at European auctions. What makes it so special?
Munich Calendar for 1887
Munich Calendar for 1887
In 1876, an exhibition of applied art was held in Munich. This large-scale event drew the attention of artists of the time to the traditions of the German Renaissance, whose most famous representative was Albrecht Dürer. Soon, a circle of like-minded people formed in the German city, who sought to develop the culture of the book, imitating the masters of the sixteenth century.  

This was the impetus for the emergence of the retrospective style now known as the Munich Renaissance. In the field of book printing, it manifested itself in richly decorated, antique-styled editions with intricate ornaments and fonts. Otto Hupp (1859-1949) was one of the most prominent representatives of this artistic trend.
Otto Hupp with his wife Franziska in the garden on his 80th birthday
Otto Hupp with his wife Franziska in the garden on his 80th birthday
A type designer, engraver, decorator, heraldic artist, ceramics master, and avid collector of everything related to heraldry and engraving, he himself came from a family with a long artistic tradition. Otto was born in Düsseldorf. He was the fourth of five sons of the medalist and engraver Karl Heinrich Hupp, and his father became his first teacher. 

After completing his studies at the Düsseldorf Academy of Arts, Hupp Jr. moved to Munich in 1878. He learned many painting techniques from the local artist Rudolf von Seitz.

Otto Hupp's rich artistic heritage includes wall and ceiling paintings of several German architectural monuments, including the Reichstag, as well as coats of arms of many cities in the country, including his native Düsseldorf.
Munich Calendar at Zisska & Lacher auction
Munich Calendar at Zisska & Lacher auction
In 1884, the Munich Central Association for Church Building (Zentralverein für Kirchenbau) decided to produce an artistic calendar, which was commissioned to Otto Hupp. The very next year, the first issue of the Münchner Kalender, designed according to all the canons of the Munich Renaissance style, was published in about 5,000 copies. The yearbook was printed by G. J. Manz.

To increase sales, the artist came up with the idea of placing a heraldic figure known as the Münchner Kindl ("Munich child") on the cover, which has been the city's coat of arms since the thirteenth century.
Some of the issues of the almanac
Some of the issues of the almanac
Munich Calendar for 1887
Munich Calendar for 1887
In 1913-1914, the circulation increased to 17 thousand, so the issues of these years are less valuable. Over the years, sales of the publication deteriorated, despite active advertising, so in 1932 the circulation dropped to 4 thousand copies, and in 1933 the Munich Calendar was not published at all. The last three issues - for 1934, 1935, and 1914 - were published by the artist himself.
Munich Calendar for 1887
Munich Calendar for 1887
During his long life, Hupp created about 6,000 images of family coats of arms, almost 3,500 coats of arms of localities, and more than 250 armorial bookplates. The calendar he created for 50 years went down in design history as the embodiment of the best that the Munich art movement of the 1880s gave to European art.

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