nat4b
nat4b
22 January, 08:53

Polish archaeologists are studying a sword found on the banks of the Vistula

Polish archaeologists are studying a sword found on the banks of the Vistula
In the Polish city of Wloclawek, located on the banks of the Vistula River, during planned dredging work, workers discovered an ancient sword. Previously, archaeologists who arrived later on the site dated the find to 950 AD.
The find was sent for thorough research to the Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń.

Experts from the Voivodship Administration for the Protection of Monuments suggest that this sword may belong to a type of swords known as Ulfberht. Such weapons are believed to be of Frankish origin.
"To date, about 170 swords of this type have been found in Europe, most of them on the coast of the Baltic Sea and in Scandinavia. Only 8 similar swords were found in Poland," said Sambir Gavinskyi, a representative of the National Service for the Protection of Monuments.
One of the special features of Ulfberht swords is the precisely defined carbon content of their steel. This unique composition gives the weapon extraordinary strength, flexibility and durability. It is because of this that they are recognized among the highest achievements of Viking blacksmithing.

Despite the widespread popularity of Ulfberht swords among the Vikings, the true place of their manufacture remains a mystery. It is believed that the center of production was located somewhere in Western Europe, but the exact location remains unknown.
According to researchers from the Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń, the sword could have been owned by a Viking warrior. This hypothesis is confirmed by the geographical context, since Wlocslawek is located at the crossroads of the main sea and land routes that connect Kuyavia, Mazovia and even extend to Kievan Rus.

A detailed study at the Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń of this Viking sword will bring new information about Viking culture and craftsmanship.

Source: heritagedaily.com

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