nat4b
nat4b
9 February, 21:49

The picture of The Beatles went under the hammer at Christie's auction for a record $1.7 million

The picture of The Beatles went under the hammer at Christie's auction for a record $1.7 million
Christie's auction became the place of sale of an item related to the work of the famous Liverpool quartet The Beatles. However, this is not another record, musical instrument or item of clothing of the performers. This is the painting "Images of a Woman" created by The Beatles.
The Beatles during the creation of the picture
The Beatles during the creation of the picture
The work of art was created in 1966 during the band's tour in Tokyo. John Lennon, Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr and George Harrison used watercolors and acrylics for their paintings, which were brought by fans of the musicians.

This painting is the only known painting that The Beatles created together. It took the musicians about two days to create it. Interestingly, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr and George Harrison never discussed the plot or composition of what they were going to paint.
"Images of a Woman is the only known significant work of art created by the four musicians during their years together, an extraordinary and unique object of original provenance," said Christie's website.
Writing a picture became a peculiar way of recreation for The Beatles. After all, these tours in Tokyo were connected with a very strict schedule and constant security. It so happened that the performers spent about 100 hours in their Hilton hotel room. And without an armed guard, they could not even go beyond it.
The reasons for these rules were quite clear - the local authorities protected the band from fans and angry persecutors who did not like the venue of the concerts - the hall of traditional martial arts "Budokan". In their opinion, this was unacceptable.

The price range for the artwork varied from $400,000 to $600,000. However, the final bid for The Beatles' "Images of a Woman" was $1.7 million.
Source: christies.com

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