Verdex
Verdex
27 May, 23:00

Antique French tapestry "Verdure with chateau and garden"

Antique French tapestry "Verdure with chateau and garden"
In the 17th century, Flanders became a center for the production of verdure - tapestries with landscapes depicting animals and birds: pheasants, peacocks, deer, etc. Often a castle or palace can be seen among the trees. The first verdures appeared in Brussels, and later manufactories opened in Oudenaarde. For the foreground, the artists selected dark shades of green and brown, while the background was lighter.
Some craftsmen migrated from Flanders to France. In 1688, Jean de Melter opened a weaving factory in Lille, which in 1701 was headed by his son-in-law, Guillaume Vernier, who moved here from Brussels. Vernier's works were widely recognized and at one time decorated the Quirinal Palace in Rome. In 1738, Vernier died, and the manufactory passed to his wife, Catherine Vernier. She had at her disposal a team of experienced workers and valuable equipment - more than 20 looms. She continued her husband's business and managed the production of verdure for 40 years.
One of the surviving works is Verdure with Château and Garden. The tapestry depicts a clearing with birds that are disturbed by a barking spaniel, one of them is about to take off. Behind the thickets there is a chateau - a well-groomed palace and park ensemble with fountains. Similar tapestries were ordered by aristocrats and other wealthy clients to decorate their country houses. Thanks to perspective, individual verdures created a sense of depth, and a set of tapestries hung around the perimeter of the hall created the illusion of open space.
Sources:
getty.edu

0
16
Comments
0
To participate in the discussion, please log in.
SearchClose
Cookies
We use essential cookies for the proper functioning of the website and additional ones to make interaction with the site as convenient as possible. It helps us personalize your user experience as well as obtain analytical information to improve the service.

If you agree to accept all cookies, click "Accept all"; if not, click "Only essential". To learn more, view the Cookie Policy.